Category Archives: Tracy

I’ll Get Rid of Rona! (1980)

I'll Get Rid of Rona logo

Published: Tracy: #43 (26 July 1980) to #53 (04 October 1980)

Artist: Unknown

Plot

Two years previously Orphan Rona Parrish had been very happy at Sunnyhills Children’s Home until she was wrongly convicted of theft (the exact circumstances of which are not discussed). Since then, she had been forced to move from children’s home to children’s home and from school to school as the stigma follows her around and people provoke her into “rebellious behaviour” when they bully her over her record. Currently these are the girls at her latest school. They call her a borstal brat, accuse her of stealing their belongings and such, and provoke her into lashing out at them. The lashing out keeps getting Rona  into trouble with the school authorities. The matron of Rona’s current home knows what is going on, but her advice to try to ignore the teasing is not very helpful.

Rona 1

When the girls’ bullying gets Rona suspended, Matron and a social worker named Miss Gregory come up with the idea of fostering Rona out to the Marchant family, in the hope that a fresh start in a locality where nobody knows her past will help. Rona jumps at it. The Marchant parents are very understanding about Rona’s past and agree not to tell their daughter Gwen or even the staff at the new school about it. When Rona arrives, she gets the immediate impression she will be happy at the Marchants’ home.

But already forces are working against Rona. Gwen seems friendly enough to Rona, but in secret she resents having a “strange brat” for a sister. And when she snoops into a confidential letter from Miss Gregory and discovers Rona’s secret, she decides it’s the limit. She sets out to get rid of Rona, figuring that Rona’s record will make it easier.

At home Gwen pulls discreet but dirty tricks to give her parents the impression that Rona is careless, untrustworthy and things always seem to get lost or stolen around her. She also gets Rona into trouble in public incidents, such as hooliganism and stealing on a paper round. At school, where Gwen has to say that Rona is her cousin from Canada, Gwen pilfers items from classmates with the intention of putting the blame on Rona when she is ready. This soon has everyone on the alert for a thief at school. Gwen is pleased to hear the other girls whispering that they suspect Rona is the thief and not Gwen’s cousin from Canada either. When Mrs Marchant hears about the thieving at school she also begins to suspect Rona, much to Gwen’s delight.

Rona 2

Things get worse for Rona when Peggy Malone joins the school. She is a delinquent and a troublemaker, and everyone soon realises she is a girl to avoid. Peggy also knows Rona’s secret because they were at the same remand home together while Rona was awaiting trial. Peggy starts blackmailing Rona, forcing her to do her homework, buy her cigarettes, do after-school work for her and be her “friend”, which makes Rona unpopular with the other girls. Gwen discovers that Peggy has a hold over Rona and decides to enlist Peggy’s help in getting rid of her.

So through Peggy, Gwen tricks Rona into selling Peggy’s aunt’s jewels and make it look like she stole them. Peggy had agreed to Gwen’s plan in anticipation that she would get money from the sale. But the jeweller gets suspicious and calls the police. The police and Miss Gregory are called in. Rona realises too late that Peggy tricked her while the police think that Rona and Peggy are in it together. However, Gwen’s plan has misfired a bit as she thought the jeweller would call her parents instead of the police, and as there has been no sale she has no money to pay Peggy with. So Gwen gives Peggy her Post Office savings instead, on condition that Peggy disappears without telling on her. The police find out about Peggy running off, which does make her look guilty, and Peggy can’t be questioned over the matter. Things now look even blacker for Rona.

Rona 5

Gwen has been keeping the items she stole from school in her Box of Secrets. She gloats over them, thinking she won’t have a foster sister much longer. But the police start a search for the stolen items at the Marchants’ home before Gwen realised what they were looking for. This means she did not get the chance to plant them on Rona; they are still in the Box of Secrets. The police find the box and insist on taking a look inside. Gwen tries to stop them by throwing the key out the window, but Dad gets his toolbox to force it open (can’t the police pick the lock?). They find not only the stolen items but also Gwen’s diary – which has all the details of her scheming against Rona and consorting with Peggy.

Rona panel 3

The subsequent fates of Peggy and Gwen are not recorded. Presumably they include expulsion and criminal charges.

The Marchants hope Rona will still stay with them, but she declines because she would never be able to forget what Gwen did. So Gwen does succeed in getting rid of Rona, who goes to stay with Miss Gregory while a new start is worked out. Then a letter arrives from Sunnyhills, which says Rona’s name has been cleared as another girl has confessed to the crime she was convicted of (rather belated, as it is two years after the event). Rona is free to return to Sunnyhills, and is thrilled to do so. When she arrives she gets a huge welcome from all the other children in the home.

Thoughts

Stories of spiteful girls who play dirty tricks to get rid of a foster girl/cousin because they are jealous, resentful or don’t want to share have been churned out in quantity at DCT. Examples include “The Dark Secret of Blind Bettina/The Lying Eyes of Linda Lee” (Mandy), “What Lila Wants…” (M&J) and “Sharing with Sonia” (Bunty).

It is unusual, though, to combine the “spiteful foster sister/cousin” premise with the blackmailer premise. Rona has not just one but two enemies working against her – one to get rid of her and one to blackmail her. And then they combine forces against her! Having both a schemer and a blackmailer against Rona puts her through far more than what a protagonist would usually go through with either premise. Added to that, Rona has had a hard time for two years, what with being wrongly convicted and then being bullied over it, which nearly gets her unfairly expelled at her old school – more injustice! Throwing the wrongful conviction premise into the mix as well certainly makes the story a far more gripping one than it would be if it was just a routine “spiteful stepsister/cousin” story.

Rona

The matron and the headmistress at Rona’s old locality must take some of the blame Rona’s “rebellious” behaviour for handling the situation badly and not taking action to stop the bullying that provokes it. Matron knows about it, but just gives Rona unhelpful advice. She does not speak up for Rona at the school and tell the headmistress to sort out the bullies. But at least the decision to get Rona away from it all in foster care was an inspired one, and would have worked out brilliantly if it hadn’t been for Gwen and Peggy. It is a bit strange that Rona stands up to the bullies at school (albeit in an aggressive manner that gets her into constant trouble) but does not stand up to Peggy at all. When Rona is caught with the jewels, she does not even try to explain about the blackmail to Miss Gregory, who knows what Peggy is like because she is on her case files.

The Marchant parents must take some of the blame for Gwen’s resentment of Rona. The fact that Gwen felt they foisted Rona onto her does suggest they did not consult Gwen or consider her feelings as much as they could have. And having Gwen tell everyone at school that Rona is her cousin from Canada is totally unfair, because that is asking both her and Rona to live a lie. And how long would it be before someone sees through that lie anyway? Surely it would have been quite sufficient and honest enough to just say that Rona is a foster sister.

Rona 6

But the fact remains that Gwen was not only spiteful but hypocritical too. She secretly riles against having a “thief” for a foster sister, yet she becomes a thief herself in her scheming against Rona, consorts with a criminal, and has no compunction or guilt about it. When she is caught out, she merely looks furious. There are no tears or shame at all. So it is not surprising and completely realistic that Rona chooses not to stay after she discovers Gwen’s plotting. So many “spiteful stepsister/cousin” stories have ended with the troublemaker being glibly forgiven and becoming best friends with the girl she tried to get rid of (e.g. Mandy’s “That Bad Bettina!”). Still, those were cases where the troublemaker did repent, whereas Gwen did not.

The sudden confession from the true thief at the end comes across as a bit contrived and too convenient. It has been two years since the crime and the thief did nothing to clear Rona in all that time – but now, all of a sudden, she does. Still, we must have a happy ending all round.

 

They Call her Tuesday Twelfth (1980)

Plot

Kathy Gregg lives a hard life slaving for her uncaring aunt and uncle in their cafe. They head off to Spain on a high-paying job, leaving Kathy to fend for herself with no money or food. While trying to think what to do, Kathy has a road accident. Her dazed state has everyone think she has lost her memory and they call her “Tuesday Twelfth” in lieu of a name, after the date of the accident. Kathy ends up in a home, and decides to go on pretending to be amnesiac for as long as she can so as not to go back to her old life.

Tuesday

Notes

Appeared

  • They Call Her Tuesday Twelfth – Tracy: #47 (August 23 1980) – ?

The Hateful Hands of Heather Smith

Plot

On a visit to Castle Cumner, Heather Smith fitted her hands into prints left on the wall by a witch, who had starved to death in the dungeons. Later, Heather’s hands began to behave as if controlled by the witch’s evil power!
hateful hands of heather smith

Notes

  • Artist: Barrie Mitchell?

Appeared

  • The Hateful Hands of Heather Smith –  Tracy: #01 (06 Oct. 1979) – #13 (29 Dec. 1979)
  • Reprinted – Judy:  #1523 (18 March 1989) – #1535 (10 June 1989)

Before the Light Goes…

Plot

Beth Marshall was left to support her brothers and sisters when her mother died. To her horror, Beth realised that she was losing her sight, and she became desperate to provide a future for the younger children before the blindness overtook her. Beth’s ruthless landlord, Mr Crumley, employed her as a seamstress.

before the light goes

Notes

  • Artist: Hugh Thornton-Jones

Appeared

  • Before the Light Goes… – Tracy: circa #196 (2 July 1983) – (?)
  • Reprinted  –  Judy: circa  #1520 (25 February 1989) – #1534 (3 June 1989)

“They’re My Mum and Dad!”

Plot

Sisters Kim and Tina Kirby’s lives changed when their  mum and dad became Houseparents at Fourways Children’s Home. Only Tina knew that Kim hated it at Fourways, and would try any mean trick to persuade her mum and dad to give up their new job.

theyre-my-mum-and-dad

Notes

  • Art: Ron Lumsden

Appeared

  • “They’re My Mum and Dad!” – Tracy: (?) – #117 (26 December 1981)
  • Reprinted – Judy: (?) – #1528 (22 April 1989)

The Saving of Sister Susie

Plot

Orphaned sisters Jane and Susie Miller were given a home by their greedy Aunt Margo and Uncle Harry. Jane was used as an unpaid servant, but was more concerned about her aunt and uncle’s plans to exploit Susie as a child model.

saving of sister susie

Notes

  • Artist: Hugh Thornton-Jones

Appeared:

  • The Saving of Sister Susie –  Tracy: #01 (06 Oct. 1979) – #12 (22 Dec. 1979)
  • Reprinted – Judy and Tracy:  #1412 (31 Jan. 1987) – #1423 (18 Apr. 1987)

The Wilsons Who Lived in a Shoe

Plot:

In Victorian times, when Peech’s Funfair closed down, the Wilson children’s father lost his job. He left for London and didn’t return. Scared of being put into an orphanage by their unsympathetic landlady, Annie Wilson and her younger brother and sister. Nicky and Sara, ran away and set up home in The Shoe, an amusement in the funfair. However, when they were confronted by the police. Nicky gave himself up in order to save his two sisters.

wilsons who live in a shoe

Notes:

  • Art: Julio Bosch (Martin Puigagut?)

Appeared:

  • The Wilsons Who Lived in a Shoe –  Judy and Tracy:  #1412 (31 Jan. 1987) – #1421 (04 Apr.  1987)

Plants of Peril

Plot:

Some huge thistledown floated into Paula Gates’ hotel room and her friend Marge Main, wanted to show it to botanist Dame Sybil Smith. But when the girls went to Flagge Manor, where they thought the botanist was staying, it was denied that she was there. On returning to the hotel the girls found that one of the thistle seeds had taken root and was growing at an alarming rate.

plants of peril

Notes:

Appeared:

  • Plants of Peril –  Judy and Tracy:  circa #1320 (27 Apr. 1985) – (?)

Beth and the Bells

Plot:

Susie and Beth Barrow were staying with their Aunt Mary in the seaside town of Barlington while their parents recovered from a road accident. When Beth disturbed the spirit of a local witch, Black Bess, while exploring an old bell tower, Susie realised that the spirit of the witch entered Beth whenever she heard a ringing bell.

beth and the bells

Notes:

Appeared:

  • Beth and the Bells –  Judy and Tracy:  circa #1320 (27 Apr. 1985) – (?)

Cinderella Jones

Plot:

A humorous update on the Cinderella story. Cindy Jones’ widower father had married again and taken Cindy to live in Brightsea. Cindy’s new stepmother owned the Happyholme Guest House and made it plain Cindy would have to work hard for her keep while her stepsisters, Isobelle and Sarah, did nothing.

cinderella_jones_002

Notes:

  • Art: Oliver Passingham
  • Art: Eduardo Feito (Surprise Party – Judy Annual 1993)

Appeared:

  • Cinderella Jones –  Judy and Tracy:  circa #1411 (24 Jan. 1987) – (?)
  • Cinderella Jones –  Judy:  circa #1458 (19 Dec. 1987) – (?)
  • Cinderella Jones –  Judy:  #1477 (30 Apr. 1988) – (?)
  • Cinderella Jones –  Judy:  #1527 (15 Apr. 1989)
  • Cinderella Jones –  Judy:  circa #1562 (16 Dec. 1989) – (?)
  • Cinderella Jones –  Judy:  #1587(09 Jun. 1990) – (?)

Other Appearances:

  • Cinderella Jones –  Judy Annual 1988
  • Cinderella Jones –  Judy Annual 1989
  • Cinderella Jones –  Judy Annual 1990
  • Cinderella Jones –  Judy Annual 1991
  • Cinderella Jones –  Judy Annual 1992
  • Cinderella Jones –  Judy Annual 1993
  • Surprise Party – Judy Annual 1993
  • Cinderella Jones –  Mandy Annual 1994
  • Cinderella Jones –  Bunty Picture Story Library:  #341
  • Cindy at Sea –  Judy Picture Story Library:  #358
  • Cinderella Jones –  Judy Picture Story Library:  #361