Tag Archives: Alison Christie

Room in your Heart for Two

Plot

Pretty and talented Dale Peters had been in Hill-side Children’s home since the death of her parents. She’d become close friends with Donna Ducksworth, a kind, but accident prone girl. Dale was determined she’d only go to a couple who’d take Donna too.

Notes

  • Writer: Alison Christie (Fitt)
  • Artist: Ron Lumsden

Appeared

  • Room in your Heart for Two – Tracy:   #209 (1 October 1983) – #224 (14 January 1984)

The Secret of Brother Ben

Plot

When Katie Balfour’s parents were killed in a plane crash, her nasty Aunt Esther, whom she had ever met before, moved into the Balfour home. Aunt Esther didn’t know Katie had a little brother, Ben and because her Aunt hated boys, Katie hid Ben in the attic, to keep him safe.

Notes

  • Writer: Alison Christie (Fitt)

Appeared

  • The Secret of Brother Ben – Tracy:  #200 (30 July 1983) – #209 (1 October 1983)

Morna’s Ancient Mum

Plot

Morna Moore loved her widowed mum dearly, but when they moved to a new housing estate, she became terribly ashamed of her mum because she was old and dowdy! In fact lots of people thought she was her gran, and Morna decided not to correct them to save her own embarrassment.

Notes

  • Writer: Alison Christie (Fitt)

Appeared

  • Morna’s Ancient Mum –  Tracy: #136 (08 May 1982) – #146 (17 July 1982)

Bev’s Bewitched Baton

Plot 

Bev Milne’s blind mum was in New York for an operation hopefully to restore her sight. She left Bev in charge of her newly formed Majorettes, telling her to use the silver baton she had used in her own majorette days. But the baton had struck a witches stone and under the evil power of witch Grizel, it was out to destroy the majorettes.

Notes

  • Writer: Alison Christie (Fitt)

Appeared

  • Bev’s Bewitched Baton –  #130 (27 March 1982) – #141 (12 June 1982)

When the Clock Strikes Twelve

Plot 

Since orphan Cindy Rollo went to stay with loving foster parents, she was over the moon with happiness. But past events convinced Cindy that she must never hear a clock strike 12 midnight, or like the story of Cinderella her happiness would disappear.

Notes

  • Writer: Alison Christie (Fitt)
  • Artist: Hugh Thornton-Jones

Appeared

  • When the Clock Strikes Twelve –  #126 (27 February 1982) – #135 (1 May 1982)

Alison Christie – DCT Writer

Alison Christie (now Alison Fitt) got her start in comics as a junior sub editor on Bunty at the age of 16. She went on to write for DCT comics Mandy, Tracy and others including nursery titles, Pepper Street, Bimbo and Twinkle and she also worked on Hi! Magazine as well as IPC titles, Tammy and Jinty. She already did an interview on the Jinty resources site which you can find here, but she also kindly gave me more details about her time at DCT as well as the stories she wrote for it.  A list of stories she wrote can be found on the next page.

Quick Link: Story list 

Memories of working in DC Thomsons:

All the comics were dreamed up and written on the second floor of that big red building in Meadowside, Dundee. There was a long corridor with offices on both sides, marked Dandy Room, or  Beezer  Room, etc- or the one I was placed in, The Bunty Room. DCT was male orientated. All men worked on these comics, including the girls’ ones! So I was one of the first females to  be given a job on Bunty.

My first task was opening the bundles of mail from readers. Many contained photos of school badges, as Bunty had a weekly feature of them on the back page. I also got to sub scripts that came in from free-lance writers. Imagine!( I thought in later years when I was sending scripts down to IPC that there might be some junior journalist subbing mine.)  I was also sent on errands- often to the Art department, with artwork needing attention. I hated going there. The artists sat in long rows facing the door, and ogled any female that ventured in. For a young girl like me, it was highly embarrassing.  Finally, having come up the best idea for a new serial, I was given the chance to write my first picture story, Queen of the Gypsies.

(Bunty: Queen of the Gypsies)

They were good times, though. The Bunty room looked out on the Howff, Dundee’s ancient grave yard. On hot summer days, us girls would scoff our sandwiches there while sunbathing amongst the grave-stones. On Fridays we received our pay-contained in secretive brown packets brought round on a tray and dished out by Jimmy from the general office below. No being paid through the bank in those days.

I was eventually moved from Bunty onto a new nursery comic called Bimbo, which ran for a while then was replaced by Little Star and Twinkle. Little Star soon folded, but Twinkle kept going.  By that time, we had moved to the eighth floor of the new courier building. I wrote Nurse Nancy storylines, and Baby Crocket, plus other features.

I left DCThomsons in 1968 and went free-lance. Still wrote for Twinkle, then started writing picture stories for DCs girls comics – Mandy, later Tracy, a few for Debbie and Nikki. At the same time I began writing picture story serials for IPC down in London. It was a great way to make a living from home, as I had three young children. It was the hey-day of British girls comics, so there were plenty of them to contribute to. But over the years, many of them folded and there weren’t so many left to write for. Though in the early nineties, DC   Thomson brought out Pepper Street a bright comic for little ones – followed by HI! a really good magazine for slightly older girls, with photo stories and fashion, etc. Neither ran for very long, but I wrote for both of them while they lasted.

Favourite age group to write for and favourite stories:

I much preferred writing for the girls comics as opposed to the nursery ones. I could get into the characters and think out what they would do or think and develop the storyline about them. Usually weepy emotional stories, though not all.

I liked all my stories  but  Room in your heart for two  and The Cloud on Sunshine cottage in Tracy and Patsy will take my place  and Emma’s Umbrella in Mandy, I particularly liked.

(Mandy – “Patsy Will Take My Place!”)

 

Frida the Thirteenth

Plot

Frida is very superstitious. So she is alarmed when she joins a new class and finds she is the thirteenth in a class of twelve students. She thinks this will bring bad luck, and many of her interactions with the other students do seem to bring unlucky consequences. Then Frida finds out there was another student who had been absent from school before she joined the class. So she was not the thirteenth after all, and all the ‘bad luck’ was nothing but coincidence.

Notes

  • Writer: Alison Christie (Fitt)

Appeared

  • Frida the Thirteenth –  Mandy: #1240 (20 October 1990) – #1249 (22 December 1990)

 

Fair Shares

Plot

The Watson family have always been hard up, but become rich when Mum wins big on the pools. The daughter Kathy, believing in “fair shares”, is determined to share her good fortune with her friends. Unfortunately her generosity always seems to backfire and make her unpopular.

Fair Shares

Notes

  • Writer: Alison Christie (Fitt)

Appeared

  • Fair Shares  –  Mandy:  #1117 (11 June 1988) – #1127 (20 August 1988)

 

Emma’s Umbrella

Plot

In 1900, Ivan’s Umbrella Shop is renowned for his beautiful personalised umbrellas, with the owner’s name inscribed on the handle. The last umbrella Ivan makes is inscribed with the name “Emma”, after the daughter he and his wife never had. The umbrella passes through a succession of owners over time, and each time it does so, it changes their lives.

Umbrella

Notes:

  • Writer: Alison Christie (Fitt)
  • Artist: Norman Lee

Appeared

  • Emma’s Umbrella –  Mandy: #983 (16 November 1985) – #990 (4 January 1986)