Tag Archives: Doris Kinnear

Debbie 1983

Picture Stories

  • Mary Brown’s Schooldays (Pages: 4-8)
  • Trixie’s Treasure Chest (Pages: 17-21) [Art: Robert MacGillivray]
  • Meg of the Moors (Pages: 24-28) [Art: David Matysiak]
  • Little Sis (Pages: 29-30) [Art: Doris Kinnear]
  • Bionic Horse (Pages: 36-40) [Art: Peter Davidson?]
  • Girl Talk (Pages: 42)
  • Spring-Heeled Jill (Pages: 43-48)
  • The House of Hate [Damian Darke story] (Pages: 54-58) [Art: Norman Lee]
  • Trendy Wendy (Pages: 59-61)
  • The Shop at Shudder Corner (Pages: 68-70) [Art: David Matysiak]
  • Animal Nurse (Pages: 71-74)
  • Oh, Brother! (Pages: 81-84) [Art; George Martin]
  • Band Together for French Skipping! (Pages: 85-87)
  • Cactus Kate (Pages: 88-91)
  • Little Sis (Pages: 99-100) [Art: Doris Kinnear]
  • Girl Talk (Pages: 102)
  • She Danced in Dockland [Madame Marlova story] (Pages: 103-107)
  • Jo and Mo (Pages: 108-112) [Art: Tom Hurst]
  • Trendy Wendy (Pages: 117-119)

Text Stories

  • The Record Run (Pages: 9-10)
  • Gran’s Old Gramophone (Pages: 41-42)
  • Lonely! (Pages: 101-102)

Photo Stories

  • Bright Eyes (Pages: 11-15)
  • Never a Borrower… (Pages: 31-35)
  • Jane at St Jude’s (Pages: 94-98)
  • The Writing in the Sand (Pages: 120-125)

Features

  • Debbie Superpets (Pages: 16)
  • Teazer Time (Pages: 22-23)
  • Debbie Superpets (Pages: 49)
  • Child’s Play (Pages: 50-53)
  • Are You Superstitious? (Pages: 62-64)
  • Tis Sal the Tiswas Gal! (Pages: 65-67)
  • Liz Sharman White Water Champion (Pages: 75-77)
  • What’s Cooking? (Pages: 78-79)
  • Debbie Superpets (Pages: 80)
  • Teazer Time (Pages: 92-93)
  • Debbie Superpets (Pages: 113)
  • Just Great Being a Jockey (Pages: 114-116)

(Click on thumbnails for bigger pictures)

Debbie 1982

Picture Stories

  • Mary Brown’s Schooldays (Pages: 4-9)  [Art: Pamela Chapeau]
  • The Black Tulip (Pages: 12-15)
  • Trixie’s Treasure Chest (Pages: 25-29) [Art: Robert MacGillivray]
  • The Shop at Shudder Corner (Pages: 30-32) [Art: David Matysiak]
  • Little Sis (Pages: 33-34)
  • The Boy Who Loved Ballet (Marlova) (Pages: 35-39) [Art: Tom Hurst]
  • The Black Tulip Part 2 (Pages: 50-53)
  • All Because of Perky… (Pages: 56- 61)  [Art: Pamela Chapeau]
  • The Puppet Theatre (Damian Darke) (Pages: 63-68) [Art: Norman Lee]
  • Spring-Heeled Jill (Pages: 71-73)
  • The Black Tulip Part 3 (Pages: 76-79)
  • Little Sis (Pages: 87-88) [Art: Doris Kinnear]
  • The Bionic Horse (Pages: 89-94) [Art: Peter Davidson?]
  • My Pal Lou (Pages: 97-101)
  • A Precious Gift (Pages: 104-106)
  • The Black Tulip Part 4 (Pages: 117-120)
  • Lovely to Look at… (Pages: 121-125) [Art: David Matysiak]

Text Stories

  • A Gift of Friendship (Pages: 10-11)
  • When the Snow was Round About. Deep & Crisp & Even…. (Pages: 54-55)
  • Meg of the Moors (Pages: 69-70)
  • Nature’s Own Special Magic (Pages: 95-96)

Photo Stories

  • A Summer Place (Pages: 17-22)
  • My Friend Flappers (Pages: 42-48)
  • Harriet (Pages: 82-86)
  • Unlucky 13 (Pages: 108-112)

Features

  • Debbie Superpets (Pages: 16)
  • Dolly Mixtures (Pages: 23-24)
  • Are You a Good Friend? (Pages: 40-41)
  • Debbie Superpets (Pages: 49)
  • Ribbons and Bows (Pages: 62)
  • What a Spread! (Pages: 74-75)
  • Debbie Superpets (Pages: 80)
  • Teaser Time (Pages: 81)
  • Are You a Party Girl? (Pages: 102-103)
  • Teaser Time (Pages: 107)
  • Debbie Superpets (Pages: 113)

(Click on thumbnails for bigger pictures)

Debbie 1981

Picture Stories

  • The Ice Roses (Pages: 4-8) [Art: David Matysiak]
  • My Pal Lou (Pages: 11-15)
  • Trixie’s Treasure Chest (Pages: 17-21) [Art: Robert MacGillivray]
  • Cat’s Eye Cottage (Pages: 22-24)
  • Little Miss Featherfeet (Pages: 33-37) [Art: George Martin]
  • Spooky Towers for Ghost and Glamours (Pages: 40-43)
  • Little Sis (Pages: 45-46) [Art: Doris Kinnear]
  • Meg of the Moors (Pages: 50-54)
  • Mary Brown’s Schooldays (Pages: 57-62)
  • Picture, Picture on the Wall… (Damian Darke) (Pages: 65-69) [Art: Norman Lee]
  • Stella From the Stars (Pages: 82-87) [Art: Tom Hurst]
  • The Bionic Horse (Pages: 88-92) [Art: Peter Davidson?]
  • A Bowl of Broth (Pages: 94-96)
  • Jo and Mo (Pages: 97-101) [Art: Tom Hurst]
  • The Shop at Shudder Corner (Pages: 108-112) [Art: David Matysiak]
  • Little Sis (Pages: 113-114) [Art: Doris Kinnear]
  • It Hurts to Say Goodbye (Pages: 120-125)

Text Stories

  • The Spirit of Christmas (Pages: 30-31) [Spot Art: David Matysiak]
  • The Happiest Christmas Ever (Pages: 63-64)
  • The Little White Flower (Pages: 70-71)
  • No Sympathy for Sandie… (Pages: 116-117)

Photo Stories

  • Don’t Laugh at Suzi (Pages: 25-29)
  • Lonely Carol (Pages: 103-107)

Features

  • Poems (Pages: 2-3, 126-127)
  • A Vet’s Best Friend.. (Pages: 9-10)
  • Debbie Superpets (Pages: 16)
  • Teaser Time (Pages: 32)
  • Are You the Practical Type? (Pages: 38-39)
  • What’s Cooking? (Pages: 44)
  • It’s Top of the Pops! (Pages: 47-48)
  • Debbie Superpets (Pages: 49)
  • Girls in Uniform – A Fair Cop! (Pages: 55-56)
  • Saffy and the Puppies (Pages: 72-77)
  • Girls in Uniform – Jenny Wren! (Pages: 78-79)
  • Debbie Superpets (Pages: 80)
  • Teaser Time (Pages: 81)
  • What’s Cooking? (Pages: 93)
  • Teaser Time (Pages: 102)
  • Debbie Superpets (Pages: 115)
  • Girls in Uniform – Jaguar Girl (Pages: 118-119)

(Click on thumbnails for bigger pictures)

Debbie 1980

Picture Stories

  • Mary Brown’s Schooldays (Pages: 4-9)
  • The Night Before Christmas (Damian Darke) (Pages: 12-16) [Art: Norman Lee]
  • Skip ‘n’ Rope (Pages: 19-23)
  • Stepping Out to Stardom (Pages: 24-25)
  • Meg of the Moors (Pages: 26-30)
  • Little Sis (Pages: 41-42) [Art: Doris Kinnear]
  • Jo and Mo (Pages: 43-47) [Art: Tom Hurst]
  • The House That Cared (Pages: 50-54)
  • My Pal Lou (Pages: 57-61)
  • Little Miss Featherfeet (Pages: 64-68) [Art: George Martin}
  • If You Can Help Somebody… (Pages: 72-76)
  • Little Sis (Pages: 79-80) [Art: Doris Kinnear]
  • Trixie’s Treasure Chest (Pages: 83-87) [Art: Robert MacGillivray]
  • The Bionic Horse (Pages: 90-94)  [Art: Peter Davidson?]
  • The Flower Princess (Pages: 97-99)
  • Polly’s Patches (Pages: 102-104)
  • London’s Burning! (Pages: 113-117) [Art: David Matysiak]
  • Swan Song (Pages: 120-125)

Text Stories

  • The Silver Locket (Abigail’s Tale-1666)  (Pages: 17-18)
  • The Silver Locket (Morag’s Tale-1746)  (Pages: 39-40)
  • …A  Poor Church Mouse… (Pages: 70-71)
  • The Silver Locket (Alice’s Tale-1840)  (Pages: 81-82)
  • The Silver Locket (May’s Tale-1912)  (Pages: 95-96)
  • The Silver Locket (Jane’s Tale-1979)  (Pages: 105-106)
  • Goodbye, Lonliness (Pages: 118-119)

Photo Stories

  • The Wishing Well (Pages: 33-37)
  • The Forbidden Garden (Pages: 107-111)

Features

  • Autumn Poem (Pages: 2-3)
  • Herbs Can Grow On You! (Pages: 10-11)
  • Accidents Will Happen (Pages: 31-32)
  • Superpets (Pages: 38)
  • Teaser Time (Pages: 48)
  • Superpets (Pages: 49)
  • Fabulous Falabellas! (Pages: 55-56)
  • Room for Improvement (Pages: 62-63)
  • Superpets (Pages: 69)
  • These Legs were Meant for Dancing! (Pages: 77-78)
  • Jim Fixed It! (Pages: 88-89)
  • It’s a Knock-Out! (Pages: 100-101)
  • Teaser Time (Pages: 112)
  • Spring Poem (Pages: 126-127)

(Click on thumbnails for bigger pictures)

Bunty – A Girl Like You

  • Bunty –  Bunty: #03 (01 Feb 1958) – #1550 (26 Sep 1987)
  • Life With Bunty –  Bunty:  #1551 (03 Oct 1987) – #1657 (14 Oct 1989)
  • Bunty – A Girl Like You–  Bunty:  #1658 (21 Oct  1989) – ?

Plot/Thoughts

While a few girl comics had generalised names like School Friend or Spellbound, the most common thing for the titles was  to be named after girls, i.e. Bunty, Judy, Tracy, Emma etc. Bunty isn’t the most common girls name, particularly these days,  so I think the name is more likely to bring up memories of the comic than a person. Bunty was represented  by a girl of the same name in the comic. For the majority of the Bunty publication she was the first thing you saw on the covers, but even after revamps, she still  survived  by moving inside the issue.

The first issue of Bunty had two girls featured on the cover a blonde and a curly black haired girl (the cover art for issue 1 by Doris Kinnear). The emphasis was more on the fact that this was a brand new comic with free gift rather than any cover character. The second issue again emphasized the free gift more than the Bunty character but it was now clear that the blonde girl was the comic’s namesake.

By Issue 3 the cover was dedicated to a Bunty comic strip. It was usually laid out with three small panels and one big panel for the pay off. There was no word balloons instead the story was told in short rhymes.  Sometimes competitions or advertised free gifts would take over the front cover but otherwise this format stayed for over 1500 issues, after which the cover had pictures depicting stories inside the comic instead.

Bunty started off as young girl with long blonde hair in plaits, later her image was updated, she seemed to look older and has a new shorter haircut. The other regular characters were her two parents, who would often be exasperated with her. Sometimes friends would pop up but mostly just as when it was convenient to the plot.

When the covers started to portray stories from inside the book. Bunty was moved to the back cover, although sometimes if an advertisement or Design a Fashion was on the back cover the strip was inside. The strip was named Life With Bunty. Her hair was short and curly and now it was a longer strip more of a story and more dialogue with word balloons, no more ryhming captions. It was still wrote as a humour strip.

This only lasted a 100 or so issues, then Bunty got revamped again. With issue 1658, the comic was now being printed  on glossy paper and inside a lot more fully coloured strips appeared. The Bunty strip was renamed again; as Bunty-A Girl Like You. I believe a regular artist for this was Andy Tew. Again Bunty got a new hairstyle to depict the change, this is even commented on on the first strip.

Her parents were still there and still recognizable as their earlier counterparts. Two more regulars were added; friends Lisa and Jo and they became a permanent trio. Jo was a black curly haired girl (I wonder if she was a nod to that black curly haired girl that appeared on the first issue!) and Lisa a red head. Often these strips concentrated on Bunty’s crush of the week, or fashion, so it was a lot more teen aimed than earlier strips. Bunty as a humour strip of a teenage girl also seemed to replace the younger Toots model.

Its good to see the comics namesake survived throughout the years and the character of Bunty was a memorable one.